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When should we teach them?

With many beloved celebrity figures such as Mckayla Maroney, Amber Rose, Lady Gaga and many more taking a stand against sexual misconduct, this topic has been brought to the forefront of many peoples concerns, not only for themselves but for future generations. This raises the question as to how we should educate kids on sexual misconduct. In order to prevent sexual harassment, it is essential we start from the beginning by introducing the topic  at a young age.

Raising kids to understand what sexual harassment is and to know their boundaries can lead kids to recognize when these actions happen.

Photo Courtesy: RAINN

According to the Rape, Abuse & Insest National Network (RAINN), 34% of children under the age of 12 are victims of sexual assault and 80% of perpetrators were a parent.

Sexual assault among children is not uncommon, however, with many victims being targeted by a family member this can cause kids to not understand the violation they faced and wrongdoing of the action.

With greater education taught in school about sexual harassment this can help lay the foundation for safer communities.

Current school lead education lacks focus on bringing awareness to sexual harassment. This creates a problem within students, because they will not understand the importance of consent.

If schools don’t begin to teach students the topic on sexual harassment and ways we can prevent the problem from recurring, the future will be ridden with sexual misconduct.

Photo Courtesy: RAINN

Teaching the issue of sexual harassment can be as simple as starting to learn about respect in elementary school. This can help minors create a habit of setting boundaries. As students enter middle school, more mature content can be introduced.

Learning at a younger age to not commit sexual misconduct can help embed habits of personal body boundaries. This will also help the youth to recognize sexual misconduct, whether it has happened to them or to others, to take a stand against it.

About Jenna Nicolas

Jenna Nicolas
Jenna is a junior at MC and is a staff writer for the Sun.

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