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Thinking in Ink

 

Artwork by Claire Sun. Francesca Hodges | Photographer
Artwork by Claire Sun. Francesca Hodges | Photographer
Artwork by Avery Francisco. Francesca Hodges | Photographer
Artwork by Avery Francisco. Francesca Hodges | Photographer
Artwork by Avery Francisco. Francesca Hodges | Photographer
Artwork by Avery Francisco. Francesca Hodges | Photographer
Artwork by Claire Sun. Francesca Hodges | Photographer
Artwork by Claire Sun. Francesca Hodges | Photographer

In the community of creativity, October is the month of tricks, treats, and a ton of talent.

Social media artist Jake Parker created Inktober in 2009 to test his inking skills and try to develop positive drawing habits. He devised 31 different drawing themes and compelled himself to abide by them all month long. His amusing challenge has since then gained popularity within the creative community, prompting artists all over the world to take part in the annual craze.

Two artists who love the autumn trend are seniors Claire Sun and Avery Francisco. Both students, who are in AP Drawing and Painting, say that the fall pastime has helped them develop their talent by impelling them to take on the unpopular medium of ink for 31 consecutive days.

“I feel as if pen and ink aren’t as popular as, say, painting or sketching, so it’s cool that Inktober puts the medium into light and really encourages  people to try something that they wouldn’t normally do,” Francisco said.

Though the challenge undoubtedly gives artists a dollop of stress to complete all of the 31 prompts, it certainly allows perfectionists to relax as well, by demanding fun sketches rather than their optimum work.

“A lot of people these days mostly  do digital art, so when they do Inktober, it’s a really nice change of pace,” Sun said. “It really brings them back to the roots of art.”

Sun and other participants have acknowledged how the month-long challenge helps artists build assertiveness in their work, since the bold and permanent medium of ink leaves little room for errors.

“It’s helped me do art with  more confidence since ink is really unforgiving,” Sun said.

Not only does the challenge allow artists to enhance their abilities, but it also accumulates an infinite amount of impressive artwork shared on social media. The Inktober artwork posted online stimulates creativity within other participants and enables artists to manage a feed that shows individual progress over time. Sun and Francisco oversee their own artistic progress on their Instagram accounts, @chyrsae and @a.francisco.art.

“I think it’s a really good way to  see how I grow as an artist over a month and also over the years as I continue to do Inktober,” Sun said.

The only spirit that will haunt artists this Halloween is the one lingering in their head reminding them to catch up on all the Inktober prompts that they’ve missed.

About Johanne Milios

Johann is a senior and a staff writer for the MC Sun. Her hobbies include eating a carton of ice cream in one sitting and crying during math class.

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